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Lashinda Demus Is All About Moms!

Moms are extraordinary women who try to bring out the best in themselves and their kids when everything is not. There are many inspiring women who have given us some of the most motivation this year, and one among them is Lashinda Demus. She is an American Athlete who...

How Sports Can Prevent More Ferguson’s

We are all well aware of the recent events in Ferguson that have sparked an uproar surrounding police brutality and racial discrimination. I’ve watched the news practically every day since the day Michael Brown was murdered, and it is disheartening. This is a touchy...

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Lashinda Demus Is All About Moms!

Lashinda Demus Is All About Moms!

Moms are extraordinary women who try to bring out the best in themselves and their kids when everything is not. There are many inspiring women who have given us some of the most motivation this year, and one among them is Lashinda Demus. She is an American Athlete who...

Getting back in shape after having a baby

Thanks for asking that question. I bet there is not one woman who is or ever has been pregnant that didn’t worry about getting back into shape post-delivery! This is one of the toughest parts of having a baby and is the reason some women are afraid to get pregnant...

The Greatest Love of All

t’s surreal to celebrate Mother’s Day alongside my own mother these days. When my sisters and I were growing...

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The Greatest Love of All

t’s surreal to celebrate Mother’s Day alongside my own mother these days. When my sisters and I...

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Lashinda Demus Is All About Moms!

Lashinda Demus Is All About Moms!

Moms are extraordinary women who try to bring out the best in themselves and their kids when everything is not. There are many inspiring women who have given us some of the most motivation this year, and one among them is Lashinda Demus. She is an American Athlete who holds the world records at 400-meter hurdles run. After she gave birth, she was seen back on tracks in six short weeks.

She was training and getting back to her athlete shape. She takes after her mom Yolanda Demus who was also a former NCAA 400 meter champion in California State University in Los Angeles. Lashinda is now a full-time mom, wife and Olympic medalist. There is a lot that happens after a woman gives birth and Lashinda wanted to bring that to the table when she returned.

She said that the doctors generally advice to let your body heal for more than six weeks but she said she started training in four which was not pleasant. This is because she had to get used to her new body where everything had changed and was not working as it used to. In her practice, there was a lot of special attention put on how the body reacts to the stress.

Demus

She also revealed that she faced depression while she was pregnant; it was more like a mixed emotion which was released. It helped me snap out of it and realise that I am getting the family that he wanted. This is the place where he did not have to choose between her career and being a mother. Both the pressure brought changes in life when it comes to thinking. She says this brings her closer to her family, which include kids, husband, her mom and the coach.

She adds that after the hard work which went into giving birth and training, it was worth it standing on the podium in Berlin. It was amazing to see the fruitful results, which made everything even more beautiful. This has given me confidence about the legacy that I am leaving for her kids. This is one which will inspire the kids to do better in whatever they choose.

She said that her growth of transforming into an athlete started in school and college, which later started her professional career. Her mothers used to have a professional career which allowed me to track her growth into the person she has become today. Sports brought discipline into her life, and from a very young age, she realised that the coach tries to make sure that the best is on the table and is the reason she is where she stands.

How Sports Can Prevent More Ferguson’s

How Sports Can Prevent More Ferguson’s

We are all well aware of the recent events in Ferguson that have sparked an uproar surrounding police brutality and racial discrimination. I’ve watched the news practically every day since the day Michael Brown was murdered, and it is disheartening. This is a touchy subject to talk about, but I believe that for things to change at all, it begins with a conversation.

I have friends of different races, and I don’t think that’s uncommon these days. But while it may be easy for us to overlook the racial tension in America on a daily basis, it clearly still exists. No matter how far some of the country has come, the problem is still a big one.

What can we do to fix it?

So often we look to political or community leaders to figure out a solution – trust me, I watched the news waiting for some solutions to be proposed! But we have to hold ourselves accountable as well. We may not all be part of the problem, but we can be part of the solution.

As I watched the events unfold in Ferguson, I thought a lot about how someone could get to the point where he or she is so disconnected from another human being that something like this could happen. I thought about my childhood and the people I interacted with and how that affected my view of other people and of the world. I realized how much of a social impact sports had on my life; how much of an equalizer it was for me and the other children I played with.

Lashinda Demus: From Youth Sports To The Olympics, Why Fair Play Should Be The Winner

Lashinda Demus: From Youth Sports To The Olympics, Why Fair Play Should Be The Winner

Lashinda Demus is someone who is looking into youth sports as she said that she wants to have something safe, fun and fair. Lashinda Demus is an American hurdler who specialises in 400-meter hurdles who has won 2011 world champion and was 2012 silver Olympic medalist. She has set many records from holding a 400m hurdles race record and is currently 4th fastest women of all time.

Demus started her journey from the 2004 Olympics where she and her team time Sheena Johnson were running at the same time. In 2009 World Championship in Athletics she improved the time with their 52.63 seconds at the Herculis meeting in July where she made a world record for the fourth time.

She told that as a mother to 11-year-old twins it is essential that they understand the importance of a fair game which will allow them to ear their very own fun and focused games. She said that she is very competitive and want to put that image on her children to reflect and grow from. There are a lot of approaches one can take from being a mom from teaching them sports to the living within the sports, which can be different when it comes to teaching.

She says although they are not athletes, she speaks from the perspective of a mom who wants to instil the importance of sportsmanship into them. She also went on to say that they have a natural ability to keep track of the winnings in a sport which is way around the sixth grade.

Demus

She brings in her mom, where she puts it a badge of honour that she taught me the things I need to know right away, which allowed them to say and grow with herself with hard work. She found her stride on the track and field when she was in sophomore where she broke her schools record in 300-meter hurdles which for 16 years is not broken.

Later she went on at the University of South Carolina; she helped her team win the forts championship that broke American records in 400-meter hurdles in 2011. Demus believes that athletes need to have equal playing fields for all the young athletes, which will create a society for entitlement. They are kids who expect things to come to them, which is not how life treats people.

Through sports and career was I allowed to dream big, she said, and with her competitive nature and hard work it paid off. It is important to understand that as a kid, one needs to work on integrity, hard work and perseverance, which comes tolerance. She encourages parents to remember that no matter the level of capabilities of a child, there are many games to win.

The Greatest Love of All

The Greatest Love of All

t’s surreal to celebrate Mother’s Day alongside my own mother these days. When my sisters and I were growing up, the attention was all on our mom for Mother’s Day. Now we are grown with our own children, and we are celebrating it together, with my mom holding the infamous title of GRAMMY!

To the Twindigs, Grammy is a master Lego builder, a comfy chair they can lay on, and simply their Grammy. I have to remind them that she was my Mommy first! And a tough one, no doubt. My mom is the epitome of “tough love.” She has never been the affectionate, hugs-and-kisses type of mom, but she shows her love in a million other ways. She has opened her house to foster children since I was in the seventh grade. She was tough on us all, but she would always say, “It’s a tough world,” and she was right!

I didn’t see it as a big deal back then, my parents bringing in foster children, but it really is. That’s a selfless love, when you see a need in someone else, and you are compelled to fulfill it if it is at all in your power to do so. That’s a transformational love – much more powerful than affection, it’s backed by transformational action that changes someone’s life for good. You know what they say, “Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach him how to fish, feed him for life.”

Getting back in shape after having a baby

Getting back in shape after having a baby

Thanks for asking that question. I bet there is not one woman who is or ever has been pregnant that didn’t worry about getting back into shape post-delivery! This is one of the toughest parts of having a baby and is the reason some women are afraid to get pregnant and have kids.

I’m here to tell you the honest truth:

1. It’s not easy to get back in shape after pregnancy.

2. Your body will never be 100% the same.

3. You are about to discover just how incredibly amazing your body really is.

I carried my twin boys for eight months, which is a long time to carry twins. I delivered them via C-section, the aftermath of which was much more painful than I expected. I really thought I would be able to just hop up and go out the door and start jogging again, which I tried about four weeks after giving birth, but my body said “NOOOOO!!” My mom had come out to South Carolina to stay with me for a couple of months, and I remember her saying, “Okay, you can’t run? That’s fine, we will walk. Let’s walk fast!”

So my mom and I went on walks the first week back. After a major surgery like that, I don’t think you should be pushing through pain, so we walked at a pace where I felt no pain. Each week after that, I progressed. Six weeks after delivery, I was jogging, but REALLY slowly. Eventually I was running actual workouts again, but my mom was beating me! Now she was a track star in her day, but still I felt so slow, like “I am NEVER going to get back! You’re beating me, I am SO slow!!” And she would say, “No, I am telling you! Something is going to happen, and it is going to click, I’m telling you. You just can’t quit! You HAVE to keep going!”

My Fellow Athletes: ASK what your sport can do for you, but also what YOU can do for your sport

My Fellow Athletes: ASK what your sport can do for you, but also what YOU can do for your sport

It’s said that track and field is an individual sport, and that’s true in many ways, but in any movement towards the promised land you will get there much faster as a team collectively rather than individually. Our sport’s culture has created track and field athletes that don’t see a future for our sport and thus keep their focus exclusively on their own career. Don’t get me wrong – doing whatever you need to do to make the best out of your professional career should always be at the forefront – but you must pay your dues. Just like we pay taxes as citizens of this country, the same things applies to being a U.S. track and field athlete. We are are the blood pumping in the body of our sport, the organs that keep the body functioning, and it seems as if little by little our body is breaking down and losing functionality.

What do I think? I think that track and field has bred a race full of leaders. This sounds like a great thing until you realize exactly what a leader is. A leader has followers, followers that share the same thoughts and concepts. Followers that will follow their lead. You see, every leader has a vision of how things should be, and it is their job to direct the followers toward that vision. But what happens when you have a bunch of leaders and no followers? A bunch of leaders with a bunch of ideas of how our sport should be now and in the future.

Our sport is in dire need of all of us athletes coming together for the greater good. I know it sounds so cliche, but it’s so true and so necessary at this time. While we are fighting amongst each other about who gets paid the most and who deserves more than one another or who’s the face of our sport, there is an uprising of people outside our circle with their own vision of what our sport should be. So how do we direct our attention toward getting all of these leaders (athletes) to come together? We can start by finding our commonalities. For instance, we all want our sport to survive, we all want our sport to be amongst the most popular sports in our country and the world, and we all want security in our sport, into which we put so much of our lives, training and sacrificing every day.

Not All Bottled Water is Created Equal

Not All Bottled Water is Created Equal

As an athlete, I am always trying to find ways to improve. And by improve, I don’t just mean get faster, although that is the ultimate goal. There are so many things that go into “getting faster” besides running faster on the track. As a hurdler, there is a lot of technique involved, so I have a lot of opportunities to finetune my mechanics, both between the hurdles and over them. We watch a lot of video and do a lot of drills.

There are many opportunities to improve off the track as well, for example with nutrition. As I’ve mentioned before, I try to stay away from supplements as much as possible and try to get all of my nutrients from real food. Nutrition is something I didn’t feel the need to worry about when I was younger, but as I’ve evolved as an athlete, my eyes have been opened to the importance of your diet and what you choose to fuel your body with.

Water is a huge focus for me, in order to stay hydrated and rid my body of toxins. I’m sure you know that drinking water is important, and many athletes and people trying to stay fit set a goal of drinking a gallon of water a day. Personally, I try to drink as many ounces as I weigh in pounds – so 135 ounces a day, which I measure in water bottles. Staying hydrated and getting rid of toxins helps your body repair and recover from your last workout.